Home Improvement

Prepare Your Hot Tub Adequately

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Hot Tub

It seems just two minutes since we were all moaning about the incredible temperatures that the summer drought, with many areas of the UK boasting record-breaking weather conditions. All of this meant that certain industries were boosted terrifically and on this occasion, we’re not referring to ice creams, but rather the sales of hot tubs.

Once regarded as a luxury item, hot tubs are certainly accessible to the masses nowadays. However, they are by no means a cheap item to purchase and this means that it is vital to care for them appropriately. The manufacturer most probably provided you with a list of regular maintenance instructions when you purchased the hot tub and while these will be sufficient on the most part, when it comes to winter you might want to take on some additional precautions. The exceptionally low temperatures and gusty winds can prompt all types of problems in your tub, which has therefore caused us to compile some of the top tips to guard against such issues.

Don’t leave your hot tub defenseless

Ok, we’re not about to compare the hot tub to some sort of defenseless animal in the cold – but you do need to do everything in your power to protect it as it hibernates for the colder months. Fortunately, you can usually carry out such action with a switch of the button, with most new models having a freeze protection function which will keep the water temperature at an appropriate level to prevent it freezing. If you don’t immediately notice such a function on your system, try looking for an auto-heat mode which will perform a similar task.

Unfortunately, these mechanisms can drain energy bills and most need to be activated every fifteen minutes or so in the winter due to constant drops in temperature. Of course, the tub will take care of this itself, but don’t be surprised to see an even bigger rise than normal in your utility bill.

Fully clean the tub before winter sets in

The last thing you want to do in the middle of winter is to delve into your tub and start clearing out all of the diseases and debris that could have formed during the time that it has been out of action. Therefore, do this just before winter is about to kick in, which should give your tub the best opportunity of staying clean and also mean that you won’t have to perform any sort of cleaning until the tub is used again.

On the subject of cleaning, you should also make sure that you use the correct chemicals for the time of year. For example, it’s no good using bromine tablets for higher temperature pools, and you should search through your local supplier to see if there are any chemicals suited for cooler environments.

Keep an eye out for power outages

We’ve already discussed the fact that hot tubs need to be kept running through the winter, in a bid to keep the temperature high and beat the freezing effects of winter. However, this can only be achieved through a constant source of power and if your pool doesn’t have access to this, the water could freeze and cause all sorts of problems to the internal parts of the pool as it expands. Therefore, as soon as you notice the power being down for any prolonged period, keep an eye on the water temperature.

Regularly check the state of the cover

They aren’t usually the most fashionable parts of the tub, but the cover is most certainly one of the most important. A cover in decent condition will keep out all of the foreign objects, whilst also insulating the water to a level which should again help to guard against freezing and reduce your running costs at the same time. A lot of these covers do tend to quickly deteriorate though, meaning that you should regularly assess the condition to ensure it is going to help your tub brave the elements. Keep checking on the buckles and the condition of the surface material, with these being the two areas which are most susceptible to damage.

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